Saturday, May 31, 2014

UPFII Agenda Item 6: Intervention of the US Government


PFII May 2014 session
Agenda Item 6, World Conference on Indigenous Peoples
U.S. Intervention, as delivered by Terri Robl
U.S. Deputy Representative to the UN Economic and Social Council
Monday, May 19, 2014

         Thank you, Madame Chair.  The United States co-sponsored UN General Assembly Resolution 65/198, which called for the World Conference on Indigenous Peoples.  Our support for this World Conference stems from the U.S. government’s policy to strengthen its relationship with tribal governments and to take indigenous peoples’ perspectives into account when formulating its broader policy objectives.         We support the resolution’s statement that the World Conference share perspectives and best practices on realizing the rights of indigenous peoples, including for the purpose of pursuing the objectives of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.
         This is the first time that senior UN and member state representatives will gather together with indigenous representatives at a UN high-level meeting to consider recommendations that indigenous peoples have presented over the years to the Permanent Forum, Expert Mechanism on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, and other UN meetings devoted to human rights, development, environment, and conservation issues.  Indigenous peoples have proposed courses of action, concerning economic development, health care, education, public safety, development of natural resources, and protection of culturally significant objects, which merit consideration.

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         We were heartened by the statement of Ambassador Gregoire this morning regarding the plans of the President of the General Assembly with respect to the World Conference outcomes.  We stand ready to assist the PGA in support of fair and inclusive arrangements, including for the negotiation of its outcome document, which all member states can accept and which take into account the views of indigenous peoples.  In order for the World Conference to be successful, indigenous peoples must be able to participate meaningfully in the preparatory process and in the Conference itself.  While there are differing views on what constitutes meaningful participation, the arrangements ultimately settled upon must be acceptable to the broader indigenous community, as it would not be productive to proceed with a World Conference on Indigenous Peoples if the main stakeholders were dissatisfied.
         The United States supports holding the informal interactive hearing called for in UNGA Resolution 66/296 soon and we look forward to those dates.  The meeting’s interactive aspect is critical, allowing participants to consider jointly how to make the World Conference as useful as possible.  The hearing structure should allow for an inclusive exchange of views, giving member states, elected and traditional indigenous leaders, non-governmental organizations, civil society organizations, academics, and others the opportunity to offer their observations.  The resolution specifies that the interactive hearing will take place by June.  Given the limited time left to hold the hearing, some interested indigenous representatives may not be able to travel to New York to participate in person.  We ask that the President of the General Assembly consider practical alternative arrangements for participation.

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         Regarding themes for the Conference’s three interactive roundtable discussions and one interactive panel discussion, we understand that indigenous peoples place priority on combatting violence against indigenous women and girls, enhanced participation for indigenous peoples at the UN, and repatriation of remains and sacred objects.  These are very important and relevant topics.  The United States believes the following themes also merit consideration:  1) Promoting economic development, preventing environmental degradation, and developing indigenous lands and resources; 2) Promoting indigenous cultures, including through education; and 3) Promoting business opportunities for indigenous peoples and promoting responsible business conduct.
         We strongly support the resolution’s call for a concise, action-oriented outcome document.  Lengthy documents can lack focus and risk being diluted to secure consensus.  The likelihood of not gaining consensus also increases with a document that attempts to do too much.  The outcome document should recommend actions for member states and the UN that would tangibly improve the lives of indigenous peoples and conditions in their communities.  Those steps may include work that UN bodies can undertake on indigenous peoples’ priority concerns, and may also include the sharing of best practices of member states on those topics.  Lastly, in order for the World Conference to meet its potential, the outcome document needs to be adopted by consensus.  We look forward to discussing the substance of the outcome document with all stakeholders and arriving at a consensus document.
         The United States has intensified its engagement with U.S.-based indigenous representatives to invite their views on the World Conference.  The

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Department of State hosted a scoping session in March and formal U.S. consultations on May 9 with representatives of U.S. federally recognized tribes and with other U.S.-based indigenous peoples, groups, and organizations.  We are working on setting up additional opportunities to consult again with U.S.-based indigenous peoples before the World Conference, possibly in July or August.
         The U.S. delegation looks forward to hearing more throughout the day on this topic from the many stakeholders present, and I thank you for your attention. 


Friday, May 30, 2014

UNPFII: Closing Remarks by H.E. Mr. Crispin Gregoire


Remarks
by

H.E. Mr. Crispin Gregoire
Special Adviser to the President of the 68th Session of the United Nations
General Assembly

Thirteenth Session of the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues

Closing Session

23 May 2014


Check against delivery.

Madam Chairman of the Permanent Forum
Excellencies
Distinguished Elders and Representatives of Tribal Governments
Members of the Permanent Forum
Representatives of Indigenous Organizations, and Civil Society Organizations
Ladies and Gentlemen

On behalf of the President of the General Assembly, I wish to express our appreciation for the invitation of the Members of the Permanent Forum for us to address the closing session of the Thirteenth Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues.

         There is no doubt that these last two weeks were a very productive engagement at UN Headquarters of Indigenous Peoples, Member States, UN agencies, and civil society.  The Permanent Forum represents a formidable part of the continuing institutionalization of the relationship between Indigenous People and the United Nations.
We are certain that from the many presentations and deliberations at this 13th Forum that will advances their aspirations for a more constructive engagement with the United Nations system, and for a clear and definitive position in the unfolding Post-2015 Development Agenda.

Madam Chair:

As regards the preparatory process for the World Conference on Indigenous Issues, I presented on 19 May the roadmap of the President for moving forward.  At this juncture, we have not received the consensus of Member States.  We have however received the support of Indigenous Peoples, and I want to convey our gratitude to Indigenous Peoples for the flexible posture that they have demonstrated in this challenging process.

During the two last two weeks, the Office of the President held several meetings with Indigenous Peoples, which ensured a profound appreciation of the views, and wishes of the Indigenous Peoples in respect of the World Conference on Indigenous Peoples.

         The President will continue efforts towards a basis for the consultation process that is acceptable to both sides.  In this regard, the President will continue the dialogue with Indigenous Peoples as we go forward.

         Next week, the Office of the President will announce the way it intends to proceed towards the consultation process.  We have reached the point where a meeting with Member States, as a prelude to the consultation process, has become indispensable.

         We look forward to the understanding and support of both Member States and Indigenous Peoples to ensure that the World Conference is realized next September.

         I thank you.

Tuesday, May 27, 2014

Mexico: Intervention at Closing Session of UNPFII May 23



 

UNOFFICIAL TRANSLATION
Provided by


Madam President,

At the end of the thirteenth session of the Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues, my Delegation cannot but express our deep dissapointment and preocupation on how the preparatory process for the World Conference on Indigenous Peoples has been conducted.

As is known, my delegation and the group of countries that support the World Conference have made ​​efforts to find avenues and compromise formulas that allow us to advance in a manner that is inclusive, transparent and predictable towards the celebration of a successful World Conference on Indigenous Peoples.

As evidenced by the adoption by consensus decision establishing the modalities for the full, effective and equal participation of indigenous peoples, the realization of this conference is an objective that the UN membership and indigenous peoples share.

Therefore, we would like to submit for the record, in a gesture of flexibility and constructive spirit, Mexico and the group of countries that supported the Conference accepted the proposal submitted by the President of the General Assembly on May 19.  This, was dependent upon that indigenous peoples showed flexibility and willingness to participate, in accepting this proposal.

Unfortunately, despite all this, we still have not received clear instructions on how to proceed on this issue, which is of the greatest importance to this organization, and especially for Latin America and the Caribbean in the ongoing fight against discrimination, exclusion and racism against indigenous Peoples.

Madam President,

My country wishes to reiterate its firm to continue to build a new relationship with indigenous peoples, based on the Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, with an intercultural perspective, respect and good faith commitment.
 

We make an urgent call to the President of the General Assembly to indicate to us on how to proceed on behalf of the Conference.


In addition, we shall remain attentive to the recommendations of the experts of this Forum on this issue.

Thank you very much.

*******

ORIGINAL STATEMENT
Sra. Presidenta,

Al cierre de esta decimo tercera Sesión del Faro Permanente para las  Cuestiones  indígenas,  mi Delegaci6n no puede dejar de expresar su profunda decepci6n y preocupaci6n par la forma en que el proceso preparatorio de la Conferencia Mundial sobre Pueblos indígenas ha sido conducido.

Como ya es sabido, mi Delegación y el grupo de países que apoya la Conferencia Mundial hemos realizado esfuerzos para encontrar avenimientos y formulas de compromiso que nos permitan avanzar de manera inclusiva, transparente y predecible  hacia  la celebración de una exitosa Conferencia Mundial sobre Pueblos indígenas.

Como lo demuestra la adopción par consenso de la resolución que dicta las modalidades para la participación plena, efectiva y en pie de igualdad de las pueblos indígenas, la realización de esta  Conferencia  es  un objetivo que la membresía y las pueblos indígenas compartimos.

Por lo anterior, nos gustarla dejar constancia, que en un gesto de flexibilidad y con animo constructivo, México y el grupo de países que apoya la Conferencia, aceptamos la propuesta presentada por el Presidente de la Asamblea General el 19 de mayo. Lo anterior, en función de que los pueblos indígenas mostraron flexibilidad y voluntad de participación, aceptando esta propuesta.

Lamentamos, que a pesar de lo anterior, aun no hayamos recibido indicaciones claras sobre como proceder en este tema, que es de la mayor importancia para esta organización, y destacadamente para la Región de América Latina y el Caribe en la permanente lucha contra la discriminación, la exclusión y el racismo hacia los Pueblos indígenas.

Señora Presidenta,

Mi país desea reiterar su compromiso decidido para seguir construyendo una nueva relación con los Pueblos indígenas, basada en la Declaración de los Derechos de los Pueblos indígenas, con una perspectiva intercultural, de respeto y de buena fe.

Hacemos un llamado urgente al Presidente de la Asamblea General para nos indique la forma de proceder en beneficio de la Conferencia.

También, quedamos atentos a las recomendaciones que los expertos del Foro realicen sobre este respecto.

Muchas gracias.

************************

Mexico: Intervencion de Clausura 13° Sesion del Foro Permanente para Cuestiones Indigenas



 
Sra. Presidenta,

Al cierre de esta decimo tercera Sesión del Faro Permanente para las  Cuestiones  indígenas,  mi Delegaci6n no puede dejar de expresar su profunda decepci6n y preocupaci6n par la forma en que el proceso preparatorio de la Conferencia Mundial sobre Pueblos indígenas ha sido conducido.

Como ya es sabido, mi Delegación y el grupo de países que apoya la Conferencia Mundial hemos realizado esfuerzos para encontrar avenimientos y formulas de compromiso que nos permitan avanzar de manera inclusiva, transparente y predecible  hacia  la celebración de una exitosa Conferencia Mundial sobre Pueblos indígenas.

Como lo demuestra la adopción par consenso de la resolución que dicta las modalidades para la participación plena, efectiva y en pie de igualdad de las pueblos indígenas, la realización de esta  Conferencia  es  un objetivo que la membresía y las pueblos indígenas compartimos.

Por lo anterior, nos gustarla dejar constancia, que en un gesto de flexibilidad y con animo constructivo, México y el grupo de países que apoya la Conferencia, aceptamos la propuesta presentada por el Presidente de la Asamblea General el 19 de mayo. Lo anterior, en función de que los pueblos indígenas mostraron flexibilidad y voluntad de participación, aceptando esta propuesta.

Lamentamos, que a pesar de lo anterior, aun no hayamos recibido indicaciones claras sobre como proceder en este tema, que es de la mayor importancia para esta organización, y destacadamente para la Región de América Latina y el Caribe en la permanente lucha contra la discriminación, la exclusión y el racismo hacia los Pueblos indígenas.

Señora Presidenta,

Mi país desea reiterar su compromiso decidido para seguir construyendo una nueva relación con los Pueblos indígenas, basada en la Declaración de los Derechos de los Pueblos indígenas, con una perspectiva intercultural, de respeto y de buena fe.

Hacemos un llamado urgente al Presidente de la Asamblea General para nos indique la forma de proceder en beneficio de la Conferencia.

También, quedamos atentos a las recomendaciones que los expertos del Foro realicen sobre este respecto.

Muchas gracias.

************************
UNOFFICIAL TRANSLATION
Provided by


Madam President,

At the end of the thirteenth session of the Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues, my Delegation cannot but express our deep dissapointment and preocupation on how the preparatory process for the World Conference on Indigenous Peoples has been conducted.

As is known, my delegation and the group of countries that support the World Conference have made ​​efforts to find avenues and compromise formulas that allow us to advance in a manner that is inclusive, transparent and predictable towards the celebration of a successful World Conference on Indigenous Peoples.

As evidenced by the adoption by consensus decision establishing the modalities for the full, effective and equal participation of indigenous peoples, the realization of this conference is an objective that the UN membership and indigenous peoples share.

Therefore, we would like to submit for the record, in a gesture of flexibility and constructive spirit, Mexico and the group of countries that supported the Conference accepted the proposal submitted by the President of the General Assembly on May 19.  This, was dependent upon that indigenous peoples showed flexibility and willingness to participate, in accepting this proposal.

Unfortunately, despite all this, we still have not received clear instructions on how to proceed on this issue, which is of the greatest importance to this organization, and especially for Latin America and the Caribbean in the ongoing fight against discrimination, exclusion and racism against indigenous Peoples.

Madam President,

My country wishes to reiterate its firm to continue to build a new relationship with indigenous peoples, based on the Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, with an intercultural perspective, respect and good faith commitment.


We urge the President of the General Assembly called to tell us how to proceed on behalf of the Conference.

In addition, we shall remain attentive to the recommendations of the experts of this Forum on this issue.

Thank you very much.

Saturday, May 24, 2014

Declaración de Abya Yala América Latina y el Caribe: Tema 6

ESTADOS UNIDOS: Declaración de Abya Yala en Foro Permanente demanda cumplimiento de resolución que garantiza paridad en Conferencia Mundial

98% de los Estados miembros de la ONU que han manifestado su apoyo a la celebración de la CMPI


FORO PERMANENTE DE CUESTIONES INDIGENAS

Naciones Unidas, Nueva York

Declaración de Abya Yala en relación con el proceso de la  Conferencia Mundial de Pueblos Indígenas

Tema 6 de la agenda



Señora Presidenta



Los pueblos indígenas de Abya Yala América Latina y el Caribe-, estamos profundamente preocupados por el hecho de que el Presidente de la Asamblea General de la 68ava Sesión, S.E. John Ashe  y algunos Estados miembros, estén cuestionando y obstaculizando nuestra participación plena y efectiva y en pie de igualdad en el proceso de la Conferencia Mundial de Pueblos Indígenas, sin respetar los principios y normas de la Declaración de las Naciones Unidas sobre los Derechos de los Pueblos Indígenas, lo que vulnera gravemente nuestros derechos inherentes.



Lamentablemente, Estas actitudes son una muestra contundente de la  exclusión, discriminación e injusticia que de manera sistemática han vivido los pueblos indígenas  en todo el mundo.



Por tanto, enfáticamente expresamos lo siguiente:



1.   Exigimos el cumplimiento a la resolución A/RES/66/296, conocido como la Resolución de las modalidades, en la cual se asegura la participación plena y efectiva y en pie de igualdad en la Conferencia Mundial de Pueblos Indígenas.

2.   Afirmamos que la Asamblea General aprobó la Declaración de las Naciones Unidas sobre los derechos de los pueblos indígenas, que en sus artículos 18 y 23 establecen el derecho de los pueblos indígenas a participar, a través de nuestros representantes, en la adopción de decisiones que afecten a nuestros derechos y elaborar prioridades y estrategias para el ejercicio a nuestro derecho al desarrollo.



Por lo tanto, los Pueblos Indígenas de Abya Yala demandamos y urgimos al Presidente de la Asamblea General, S.E. John Ashe, que honre y cumpla la Resolución de Modalidades adoptada por los Estados miembros de la NU y las normas y principios que reconocen los derechos de los pueblos indígenas.



De igual manera queremos resaltar la importancia del Documento de Alta que tiene como referencia de la ONU (A/67/994), que  ha sido producto del consenso adoptado por todas la regiones indígenas del mundo, y que contiene los principios fundamentales y las aspiraciones de nuestros pueblos, la cual proporciona una base firme para redactar el documento final de la Conferencia Mundial de Pueblos Indígenas.



Por último, exigimos al Presidente de la Asamblea General que tome en cuenta la opinión del 98% de los Estados miembros de la ONU que han manifestado su apoyo a la celebración de la CMPI, con la participación plena y efectiva y en pie de igualdad, y  exhortamos a los Estados que no lo han hecho, se unan a esta loable decisión.



Muchas gracias

Statement by President of UN General Assembly: "NO CONSENSUS" on UNHLPM 2014

YouTube:
on the road map to realization of the High Level Plenary Meeting in September before the closing session of the 2014 United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues:
"NO CONSENSUS"
on moving forward from the member states.

***********************
The Writing is on the Wall



To denominate the UN-HLPM 2014 a World Conference on Indigenous Peoples in the context of UN proceedings is in error.  It would be the equivalent of taking the millennial history that we as Nations of Indigenous Peoples of Mother Earth share collectively in our ancestral memory, with all of its diversity, self determination, dimensionality and spirituality, and subscribe and subjugate that memory to the narrative of the states and their masters.  It would a flat world Madam Chair, and although the writing is on the wall, the world is not flat.

###

Link:

TONATIERRA

The HLPM 2014 and the Territorial Integrity of Mother Earth

 

Friday, May 23, 2014

UNPFII Agenda Item 9: Future Work - Intervention by American Indian Law Alliance


Thirteenth Session of the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues (UNPFII)
12-23 May 2014, UN Headquarters, New York, NY
Agenda Item 9: Future work of the Permanent Forum, including emerging issues 

Joint Intervention of The American Indian Law Alliance, and the Haudenosaunee, the Seventh Generation Fund for Indigenous Peoples, Loretto Community, Native Children’s Survival, Tonatierra, American Indian Community House, Rigoberta Menchú Tum Foundation, Flying Eagle Woman Fund for Peace, Justice, and Sovereignty, Southern Diaspora Research and Development Center, United Methodist Women, Spiderwoman Theater, Morning Star Foundation, WESPAC Foundation and the Connie Hogarth Center for Social Action.

May 22, 2014

Presented by Ms. Tonya Gonnella Frichner, Esq. (Onondaga Nation)


1) We wish to bring to the attention of the Forum, the Alta Outcome Document, from the Global Indigenous Preparatory Conference for the United Nations High Level Plenary Meeting of the General Assembly to be known as the World Conference on Indigenous Peoples 10-12 June 2013, Alta (A/HRC/EMRIP/2013/CRP.2) which took place on the traditional territories and lands of the Sami people in Alta, Norway, which states in paragraph 29, 
“Pursuant to the universal application of the right of self determination for all Peoples, recommends that the UN recognize Indigenous Peoples and Nations based on our original free existence, inherent sovereignty and the right of self determination in international law. We call for, at a minimum, permanent observer status within the UN system enabling our direct participation through our own governments and parliaments. Our own governments include inter alia our traditional councils and authorities.”

2) The Alta Outcome Document calls for a minimum of permanent observer status within the UN system. Recognizing the wide array of rights and privileges accorded to permanent observers, we support this call.


3) Therefore Madam Chair, we would respectfully request that the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues consider for its future work the following recommendation:


4) Recognizing that the Haudenosaunee and other indigenous Nations and Peoples have continued to express their fundamental right to self-determination and their original unbroken right to sovereignty over their lands, resources, and territories; we recommend permanent observer status be given serious consideration, building upon the recommendation of the Expert Mechanism on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples in 2011,
“adopt, as a matter of urgency, appropriate permanent measures to ensure that indigenous peoples’ governance bodies and institutions, including traditional indigenous governments, indigenous parliaments, assemblies and councils, are able to participate at the UN as observers with, at a minimum, the same participatory rights as non-governmental organization in consultative status with the Economic and Social Council” (A/HRC/18/43).

5) We would go further, Madame Chair, and draw attention to the permanent observer status of entities which have received a standing invitation to participate as permanent observers in the sessions and the work of the General Assembly and while maintaining permanent observers at UN Headquarters, such as the Permanent Observer Mission of the Holy See and the Permanent Observer Mission of Palestine. Indigenous Peoples and Nations cannot be locked into a minor position; our position has always been that we are equal to all peoples and nations. 
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Wednesday, May 21, 2014

Palabra de Arthur Manuel: "Esta WCIP Falsa (CMPI) es un insulto a los pueblos indígenas."


Red Indígena sobre Economías y Comercio
( INET )

Foro Permanente sobre Cuestiones Indígenas de las Naciones Unidas

(UNPFII)


lunes 19 de mayo

Me gustaría empezar felicitando Dalee Sambo Dorough por su elección como nueva Presidenta del Foro, y agradecer el Foro por darme la oportunidad de hablar.

Cuando me enteré de que las Naciones Unidas estaba realizando una conferencia bajo el nombre de CONFERENCIA MUNDIAL SOBRE LOS PUEBLOS INDÍGENAS yo tenía esperanzas.  Yo sabía que dependía de la buena voluntad de los estados, pero también entendí que una conferencia de la ONU será un evento de mayor importancia.  Como otras conferencias de la ONU sobre temas importantes, estas conferencias anteriores duran en períodos de mas de diez días y atraen más de 10,000 delegados.  Estas conferencias de la ONU sirven para armar planes de acción de doscientos o trescientos artículos para garantizar que sus peticiones de justicia serán escuchados por todo el mundo.

Yo también sentí contento que las siglas de lo conferencia iban a ser WCIP.

Estas siglas son las mismas que la generación de mi padre había utilizado en el establecimiento del innovador CONSEJO MUNDIAL DE LOS PUEBLOS INDÍGENAS en 1975.  Esperaba yo que esto significaba que el mismo espíritu de esperanza y independencia de nuestros pueblos que fueron señalados en el primer Consejo Mundial de Pueblos Indígenas nos acompañara también en esta Conferencia Mundial sobre Pueblos Indígenas.

Pero como hemos enterado más y más sobre esta conferencia, hemos visto que es una gran decepción para los pueblos indígenas.  De hecho, es peor que una decepción.  Es un insulto a los pueblos indígenas.

La nombrada “Conferencia Mundial sobre Pueblos Indígenas” no será una conferencia donde nuestra problemática esta situada en cima de la agenda del mundo por una semana para examinar de serio nuestras cuestiones, donde nosotros como pueblos indígenas juntos podamos armar un plan de acción para iniciar la reparación del daño de 500 anos de colonialismo. 

NO.  Este evento esta programado de forma muy apresurado en nomas un medio día. No es una conferencia por cualquier criterio, pero solamente una plenaria bajo el control de muchos de los mismos estados que históricamente y actualmente siguen oprimiendo a nuestros pueblos.

Cuando nos fijamos en lo que es ahora se propone, vemos que la Conferencia Mundial sobre Pueblos Indígenas en realidad ya fue cancelado por la misma ONU y remplazado por esta otra cosa, la Reunión Plenaria de Alto Nivel.

En vez de una conferencia actual de la ONU, se nos ofrece una genuflexión espuria en el altar de los derechos indígenas, con un corto homilía de parte de nuestros opresores y luego nada mas, no sólo sin ninguna iniciativa seria, pero incluso sin ninguna discusión seria.

Este llamado “Conferencia Mundial sobre Pueblos Indígenas” es la perpetuación de la realidad que nos ha dejando 370 millones de los pueblos de mundo en la el sótano de la sociedad, subyugados a las fuerzas genocidas que nos siguen oprimiendo socialmente, culturalmente, y políticamente.  En nuestra lucha diaria por la supervivencia, nuestros Pueblos Indígenas piden un dialogo con el mundo, abogamos por el derecho a determinar nuestro propio futuro y de salvaguardar nuestras tierras tradicionales.

Esta “conferencia” no ofrece ninguna de estas cosas.

Esta WCIP Falsa (CMPI) es un insulto a los pueblos indígenas. Mi padre, ya fallecido, seria profundamente ofendido que esta falsa conferencia podría llevar las mismas siglas del original Consejo Mundial de Pueblos Indígenas.
Deje que las Naciones Unidas ponga nombre a su evento en septiembre por lo que es: una Reunión Plenaria de Alta Nivel sobre Cuestiones Indígenas, y reservamos el nombre de la Conferencia Mundial de los Pueblos Indígenas para una verdadera conferencia que queremos construir juntos con los pueblos del mundo: Una Conferencia Mundial real diseñado por los propios pueblos indígenas para enfrentar nuestras necesidades muy reales y muy urgentes  La reunión de la ONU en septiembre no es ninguna de estas cosas.
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Tuesday, May 20, 2014

TONATIERRA: Human Rights and the Territorial Integrity of Mother Earth


Territorial  Integrity  of  Mother Earth
The
TIME
Is
NOW

Recommendation to the 13th Session of the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Peoples

12-23 May 2014   UN Headquarters   New York
Human Rights
and the
Territorial Integrity of Mother Earth

Statement of Tupac Enrique Acosta, Huehuecoyotl

Calpolli Nahuacalco, Izkaloteka

In the Spirit of the Territorial Integrity of Mother Earth


Good greetings to you all:


To the ancestors and the Nations of Indigenous Peoples of these territories, to the Memory and Spirit of each of the Indigenous Peoples of Tonantzin, Our Sacred Mother Earth now in attendance, to the members of the UN Permanent Forum and all the support staff at this 13th Session of the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues.


A special greeting and congratulations to our Chairperson, Ms. Dalee Sambo Dorough and also a word of recognition for the deceased leaders and spiritual guides of our Nations of Indigenous Peoples who led the way in the struggle in the international arena for recognition, respect, and protection for the rights of Indigenous Peoples. We invoke their vision and strength once again here today, we call upon the leadership of Billy Frank, we call upon the strength of Tomas Banyacya, and all the others relatives of our Indigenous Peoples who acted upon the responsibility for our future in their time.

****************

The Right of Memory and the Rule of Law


A fundamental ability of all peoples that is shared equally is the power of coherence that is manifest when information is processed through the mechanisms of Human Cognition and becomes knowledge. In these processes, the establishment of context is what provides the horizon of awareness that allows information to become knowledge and in turn, the knowledge thus gained is then reflected in the memory and the history of our common humanity.

It can be said then that the power of Memory is also one of the most fundamental of Human Rights, and as Indigenous Peoples engaged here at the 13th Session of the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues, we here-now Nican Tlacah once again testify in terms of the exercise of our Right of Memory as Peoples, Equal to all other Peoples, our history is also equal to all other histories of all other peoples.


In the development of norms, protocols, policies, and international legal obligations which frame the discussion here today on the issue of Human Rights, we as Nican Tlacah bring attention to the means by which language has been utilized as the perfect instrument of empire and colonization.  We simultaneously proclaim that the TIME is NOW for our Nations of Indigenous Peoples to bring forward and express with our own language systems, wherein our ancestral memories are embedded, the necessary bridge concepts to make the necessary and inevitable transition to a reciprocal and complementary transition of Human Society with the Natural World of Mother Earth.  This is our responsibility, this is our right.


In addressing the theme of Human Rights of Indigenous Peoples which has been ongoing here at the Permanent Forum for the past thirteen years, we have been privileged to listen to the stories of all the Indigenous Peoples from around the world who have shared their narratives of struggle and self determination in the collective fight at the planetary level to address the injustices of colonialism, colonization, genocide and TERRACIDE.  In the current horizon of planetary Climate Chaos, exacerbated by the injection of greenhouse gases of industrial human society into the atmosphere, compounding the phenomena of Climate Change, we are faced with the ominous threat of standing at the brink of a new horizon of catastrophic dimensions for the future of all Human Society.


This is known, and the most recent reports by the UN Committee on Climate Change corroborate this reality, but we as Indigenous Peoples recall and remember when this report was first brought to the UN by Tomas Banyacya of the Hopi Nation who addressed the General Assembly and gave account of the legend of the House of Mica and the Hopi Prophecy.  We also recall the storm surges that intervened here at the UN and shut down the supply of electrical power to the edifice on that day in 1993.


Going further back by twenty years into our memory as Indigenous Peoples and our engagement with the UN system, we also recall the Chiefs of Wounded Knee ’73 and the mandate of the Independent Oglala Nation who were sent here to this same edifice to re-instate the corpus of International Treaties and agreements between our nations and the government states of the UN system as part of the body of International Law to be recognized, respected and integrated into the Rule of Law for all Peoples, in Equality with all Peoples.  For, in Equality as Peoples with all other peoples, the treaties of our Nations of Indigenous Peoples are also equal to all other treaties.


In terms of Human Rights of Indigenous Peoples, when addressing the fundamental to the right of nationality, as members of the Nations of Indigenous Peoples of Abya Yala, the Great Turtle Island which is referenced in article 6 of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, and evidenced unequivocally by the Treaty Status, namely international personality which was subject of the UN Treaty Study conducted by Miguel Alfonso Martinez, the collective right of nationhood of Indigenous Peoples is an inherent right in international law that is  not subscribed under contextual constraints of the Westphalian system of sovereignty of states.


The inherent Right of Nationality of Indigenous Peoples is a collective right, similar to how the present UN system of mutual international recognition as sovereign states provides the framework of jurisprudence for the purported jurisdiction of the states individually and then collectively at the global dimension under the dominion of the UN system, the jurisprudence which articulates the nationhood of Indigenous Peoples is also is a projection of jurisdiction at the planetary level, with mutual responsibilities towards the Territorial Integrity of Mother Earth, and the well being of the Future Generations.  The distinction being that our Rights of Nationhood emerge from the COGNITION, and then thus RECOGNITION, of our responsibilities as ONE of the Nations (two legged species of kindom) – among ALL of the RELATIONS to whom and with we share as human society collectively, the responsibility to act in complementarity within the equally shared environment of the Natural World.


We are Nations of Mother Earth, and will not consent to be diminished or to be dominated under the regime of the government states of the UN system as mere ethnic groups, or minorities.


It is positive sign to hear from the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights on the developing concept of “juridical dialogue” among the Nations of Indigenous Peoples and the states.  In this spirit, and in further revelation of the principle of juris-genesis, we advise that the Permanent Forum should address without discrimination violations of the right to self-determination and full and equal participation of Indigenous Peoples, equal to all other peoples in the concept, design, implementation and evaluation of each and every one of the UN actions and policies that involve our Indigenous Peoples and the protection of our collective rights.  In particular, regional trade agreements among member states of the UN, such as the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and the imminent threat of Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPP for short English) should be juridically evaluated as instruments that violate of the right of Full and Equal Participation as Peoples, equal to all other peoples.



In consideration of the above, we propose, determine and recommend:



We call for the restitution of the primary source materials and testimony that was lent to the United Nations system as fundamental to the evidence in document form of the systemic (system to system) nature of the legal relationships between the Nations of Indigenous Peoples and the member states of the UN system for the purpose of the Treaty Study conducted by Dr. Miguel Alfonso Martinez of Cuba.



Such delivery, should be initial act of good faith in terms of the continuing process of systemic documentation among the Nations of Indigenous Peoples and the UN system prior to and as a necessary act of condition to allow for the full and effective participation of the Indigenous Peoples with the UN systems on an equal basis and without systemic discrimination, in particular in the process of producing the Final Outcome Document of the High Level Plenary Meeting of the General Assembly 2014.


Tupac Enrique Acosta, Huehuecoyotl


Endorsers: Maya Vision - Centro Cultural Techantit